Weight Stigma Awareness Week (#WSAW2020), on September 28 – October 2, 2020

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In an enlightening hadith (prophetic narration), the Prophet  tells us that no one with an ounce of arrogance in his heart will enter Paradise. In seeking to understand what arrogance means, the companions asked “O Prophet of Allah, what if a person likes to dress well?” The Prophet  responded, “Allah is beautiful and loves beauty. Arrogance is rejecting truth and looking down on people” [Muslim]

 

Weight Hate  often rests on rotten ground and unfounded beliefs that lead to unwarranted biases and trauma. It’s easy to claim that you don’t care what anyone else says or does, but when you’ve been conditioned to think of romantic companionship as the lynchpin of all your success, it’s difficult to disengage.

 

Dear Readers,

 

We hope you’ll Stand up for NEDA’s Weight Stigma Awareness Week 2020, dedicated to ‘End Weight Hate’. Just like last year, their message this year also echoes strong words of last year, how weight stigma and weight discrimination affects people of all sizes. This week is also an opportunity for all of us to reflect on how we treat people, who are different in size.

Weight Hate  often rests on rotten ground and unfounded beliefs that lead to unwarranted biases and trauma. It’s easy to claim that you don’t care what anyone else says or does, but when you’ve been conditioned to think of romantic companionship as the lynchpin of all your success, it’s difficult to disengage.

 

We stand in solidarity with NEDA and supports their Weight Stigma Awareness Week 2020#WSAW2020. 

 

Weight discrimination is very common in our society. It doesn’t matter what size you are, you re most likely to hear some kind of comment on your body size. As one of our friend said, ‘it’s impossible to be a size that will make everyone happy’. Weight discrimination is often masked under saccharine sweet coats of concern and worry, and comes from incredibly close quarters. People who attack people on their don’t want the best for them. They just want to feel righteous in their own bodies and contexts. Nothing else.

 

 

 

Please Find Below WSAW2020 Graphics and Messaging from NEDA, do share them. Please visit their website for more information and resources. 

 

 

During NEDA’s second annual Weight Stigma Awareness Week (#WSAW2020), on September 28 – October 2, 2020, we want to End Weight Hate and help the broader eating disorders community understand why weight stigma should matter to everyone- all bodies, not only those in higher weight bodies.

Especially when it comes to eating disorders—all eating disorders—we, as a community, need to understand how weight stigma and weight discrimination affect people of all sizes, how it contributes to and exacerbates eating disorders in people of all sizes, and how we can all work together with a unified voice to eliminate stigma and discrimination based on body size.

 

 

 

 

Juggun Kazim Talks about Weight Shaming

 

Body shaming, weight hate is heart-breaking. Successful, creative, talented individuals have to keep justifying their existence because they don’t find their size on a ‘normal’ store’s rack. They’re reduced to their weight because that’s the easiest way to dismiss a person.

 

 

 

We would like to share with you youtube video on weight discrimination by soon to be mother Pakistani Anchor Juggun Kazim. In 2019, Juggun Kazim spoke about being fat shamed during her pregnancy and after her miscarriage.

She revealed that she lost her baby during the last week of August 2019 and went on to say how she was subjected to fat-shaming after gaining weight during her pregnancy.

Juggun posted on her Instagram: “A humble request! Until a few days ago, I was pregnant. For some reason, I gained a lot of weight really, really quickly.

“But what shocked me was how much I started getting fat-shamed.

“One lady said, ‘Lagta hai Lahore ki hawa lag gaye hai (It looks like you’ve been struck by the winds of Lahore)’.”

The actress went on to state that “women just told me bluntly that I had become a bit too healthy”.

She added: “Until now, I wasn’t ready to share the news that I had been expecting a baby because my pregnancies have generally been precarious.”

Juggun then revealed that she suffered a miscarriage.

“Just last week, I had a miscarriage. My doctor has now told me that this time, it was quite serious and that there had been a lot of internal bleeding.”

 

Juggun also talked about how when she lost weight, she was still a target of people’s comments. It’s like society is never happy with you and is constantly bent on criticizing you no matter what size you are.

 

The following video talks about her current and very difficult pregnancy journey, where she was instructed by her doctor to have a complete bed rest.  Juggun talks about difficult pregnancy, depression, being in hiding and being a target of trolls who pass unpleasant comments on how she looks now. Please watch the video below on how she challenges those stereotypes, trolls and gives us a positive message to reflect on.

 

Body-shaming doesn’t forgive anyone. Women’s weight, men’s height and everything in between is apparently fair game for self-appointed custodians of morality and rightness, who can gauge a person’s worth by estimating their body stats. It’s easy to slap labels like ‘lazy’ and ‘hedonistic’ on people who don’t look too much like us. What’s difficult is to hold a mirror to society and expose the double standards. Hainda Kaur

 

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Islam and Eating Disorders founded in 2012 – run by Maha Khan, the blog creates awareness of Eating Disorders in the Muslim world, offers information and support for sufferers and their loved ones.

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