Treating Athletes with Eating Disorders and Unhealthy Sport Environments

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Eating disorders are at least as prevalent in athletes as they are in the general population, if not more prevalent. Athletes may need tailored eating disorder treatments given individual, systemic, and cultural risk and maintenance factors that are unique to sports. It is essential for treatment teams to understand the nature and function of maladaptive exercise behaviors in athletes with eating disorders.

 

 

Dear Readers,

 

Please find below registration details for webinar, ‘Treating Athletes with Eating Disorders and Unhealthy Sport Environments’. We will see you there. To Register Click on the link below.

Eating disorders are not well understood as athletes transition out of sport. Careful attention in treatment is required due to nuanced differences in symptoms and conceptualizations. This webinar equips you with screening and treatment tips for your patients who exhibit these symptoms. After viewing this webinar, you will be able to:

  • Describe core treatment considerations for athletes with eating disorders based on their level of care, including how to navigate the complexities of exercise.
  • Critically evaluate larger systemic and cultural risk and maintenance factors that many athletes with eating disorders face.
  • Identify ways in which they can participate in changing the culture around eating disorders in sport.

Treating Athletes with Eating Disorders and Unhealthy Sport

Environments

 

Date: Friday, June 3, 2022

Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm EST

 

 

 

Register Now

 

 

Topic: Treating Athletes with Eating Disorders and Unhealthy Sport Environments

Time: Friday, June 3, 2022 from 1:00pm – 2:00pm EST

 

Presenter: Rachael Flatt, M.A., Clinical Psychology Doctoral Candidate

Credit: 1 CE for Psychologists or 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)

 

Description:

Eating disorders are at least as prevalent in athletes as they are in the general population, if not more prevalent, and require careful attention in treatment due to nuanced differences in symptoms and conceptualizations. We will discuss how eating disorders in athletes may need tailored treatments given individual, systemic, and cultural risk and maintenance factors that are unique to sports. We will also discuss treatment considerations for athletes based on levels of care and an athlete’s life cycle.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe core treatment considerations for athletes with eating disorders based on their level of cre, including how to navigate the complexities of exercise.
  • Critically evaluate larger systemic and cultural risk and maintenance factors that many athletes with eating disorders face.
  • Identify ways in which they can participate in changing the culture around eating disorders in sport.

Speaker Bio: 
Rachael Flatt, M.A., is a 2010 Olympian, U.S. National Champion, and World Junior Champion in women’s figure skating. She is also a 3x World Team Member, with a top finish of 5th, and a 4x Senior Grand Prix Silver Medalist. After retiring from skating in 2014, she graduated from Stanford University, with a Bachelor’s in Biology and a minor in Psychology. She then served as the Programs Director at the Center for m2Health and managed several research studies that leveraged digital mental health tools to improve treatment outcomes, particularly for eating disorders. In 2018, she began her doctoral studies in UNC-Chapel Hill’s Clinical Psychology program under the mentorship of Dr. Cynthia Bulik where she researches eating disorders with a focus on digital mental health tools and athlete mental health. She continues to play an active role in the sports community as an athlete representative for the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee’s Mental Health Task Force and Racial and Social Justice Council and on U.S. Figure Skating’s Board of Directors, among other positions.

 


Accreditation Statement
The National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders (NCEED) is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The National Center of Excellence for Eating Disorders (NCEED) maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

The School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Credit Statement
The School of Medicine of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) ™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

To access your credit for this activity, go to www.med.unc.edu/cpd, click on the transcript link, choose UNC Onyen, and log in with your onyen and password. You can then generate a report showing your credit for the time period you specify. If you do not have an onyen, please contact the CME Coordinator (douglas_hudson@med.unc.edu). Your credit will be available 1-2 days after the activity.

Disclosure statement

This activity has been planned and implemented under the sole supervision of the Course Director, Jean Doak, PhD, and the planning committee listed above, in association with the UNC Office of Continuing Professional Development (UNC CPD). The course director, planning committee members, content developers, and CPD staff have no relevant financial relationships with commercial interests as defined by the ACCME.
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Islam and Eating Disorders founded in 2012 – run by Maha Khan, the blog creates awareness of Eating Disorders in the Muslim world, offers information and support for sufferers and their loved ones.

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