Bella Hadid details shocking diet plan from anorexic past: ‘I felt so out of control’

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Bella Hadid has just taken a trip down memory lane and broken down her days in High School and the eating disorder she carried in secret.

She made these admissions about eating three raspberries and celery sticks during her interview with Vogue.

The supermodel got candid about her struggles after admitting that Adderall triggered her eating disorder, at least in part.

Reason being that her psychiatrist at the time felt she was living with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), even though she was actually displaying symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Recalling some of those days from back in High school she explained, “I’d pack my little lunch with my three raspberries, my celery stick. I was just trying, I realize now, to feel in control of myself when I felt so out of control of everything else.”

“I can barely look in the mirror to this day because of that period in my life,” Bella later went on to admit. 

 

 

Dear Readers,

 

Please find below an article that was published in Bloomberg and News International on American model Bella Hadid and her battle with Eating Disorder. Recently Bella was also involved in raising awareness of discrimination against Muslim women who wear hijab. In recent times more influencers and celebrities are coming out with their battles with body image and  eating disorders. The key to defeating eating disorders is getting in the know and educating people about this deadly illness. Eating Disorders are mental illnesses and can be defeated with treatment and support. Eating Disorders is a difficult, and personal topic that affects everyone differently on many levels. When influencers and famous people share their personal experiences it reaches larger audience and creates much needed awareness. Thank you Bella for sharing your experience.

 

 

 

Bella Hadid Says She Now Makes a Conscious Effort to Protect Her

Mental Health

 

 

Bella Hadid says she now makes a conscious effort to protect her mental health after years of believing she “didn’t have the right to complain” or have therapy.

The supermodel acknowledged her privileged upbringing but said she had always been “misunderstood” by people around her and the fashion industry.

Speaking to Vogue, the 25 year-old opened up about her struggles with eating disorders, anxiety and professional burnout.

“My immediate trauma response is people-pleasing,” she told the fashion magazine.

“It literally makes me sick to my stomach if I leave somewhere and someone is unhappy with me, so I always go above and beyond, but the issue with that is that I get home and I don’t have enough for myself.

“For so long, I didn’t know what I was crying about. I always felt so lucky, and that would get me even more down on myself.

“There were people online saying ‘you live this amazing life’. So then how can I complain?

“I always felt that I didn’t have the right to complain, which meant that I didn’t have the right to get help, which was my first problem.”

Hadid, who has modelled for high-fashion brands including Bulgari, Dior and Versace, got a nose job at the age of 14 – something she regrets.

“I wish I had kept the nose of my ancestors. I think I would have grown into it,” she told Vogue.

“People always have something to say, but what I have to say is, I’ve always been misunderstood in my industry and by the people around me.”

She added: “When you are forced to be perfect every day, in every picture, you start to look at yourself and need to see perfection at all times, and it’s just not possible.

“So now everything that I do in my personal life is literally to make sure that my mental state stays above water.

“Fashion can make you or break you.

“And if it makes you, you have to make a conscious effort every day for it not to break you.”

 

 

 

 

 

ot to break you.”

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Islam and Eating Disorders founded in 2012 – run by Maha Khan, the blog creates awareness of Eating Disorders in the Muslim world, offers information and support for sufferers and their loved ones.

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