Dina Tokio Muslim Fashion Icon’s Battle with Bulimia

0

cropped-Arabic-Logo-1.png

Dina Tokio Fashion Blogger’s Battle with Bulimia: “The mind of a young girl, who is otherwise perfectly healthy and who should be happy, is thus occupied by unrealistic sentiments of this pitiless world. She is bombarded with messages telling her that she’s not perfect, doesn’t fit in and isn’t attractive. All because a couple of glossy pages told her so.”

 

 

Dear Readers, 

 

Please find below video on one of the world’s most recognisable Islamic fashion icon Dina Tokio’s battle with Bulimia. I’m also sharing an article that  appeared in the September 2012 Luxe issue of Aquila Style magazine where Dina Tokio talks about her war with the Demon of Eating Disorder. 

Warning: the video maybe triggering for some readers.

 

 

About Dina Tokio;

British, UK based Egyptian|English fashion designer & blogger. She’s also a wife and a dotting mother to a beautiful girl. 

 

 

Aquila Style

 

The difference between fact & photoshopped

 

no-point-dwelling-on-the-past-sm

Dina Toki-o is a prolific stylemeister with a global following that is hungry for her candid opinions on everything under the sun. All that sassiness belongs to a woman with her own story to share about body image issues.

 

The difference between fact & photoshopped

Dina Toki-o is a prolific stylemeister with a global following that is hungry for her candid opinions on everything under the sun. All that sassiness belongs to a woman with her own story to share about body image issues.

Dina Torkia
London, United Kingdom
Age: 28 years old
Height: 167cm
Weight: 62kg

We’re always reading about eating disorders, confidence issues, diet problems, the body images of women, and articles with titles like “how to look good naked” in certain magazines. And there’s always a tragic story somewhere in the pile telling us about a young girl who is facing death, has attempted suicide or is living in a state of utter depression, all because she’s been told that she is fat or not beautiful enough. She might be going through bulimia, anorexia, binge eating or something else similar. Such magazines, with their photoshopped images of “perfect” figures and “beautiful” faces, brainwash our minds and feed off our insecurities. Their pages are plastered with society’s distorted idealisations of how a woman – and even a man – should look.

I didn’t know it then, but my method of weight loss was a type of bulimia

The mind of a young girl, who is otherwise perfectly healthy and who should be happy, is thus occupied by unrealistic sentiments of this pitiless world. She is bombarded with messages telling her that she’s not perfect, doesn’t fit in and isn’t attractive. All because a couple of glossy pages told her so.

Reading about these girls, we may not imagine ourselves or those close to us going through such a traumatising experience. Many of us don’t know anyone who could ever let herself be affected by the distorted images that the media throw at us.

But for some of us, these problems settle close to home.

It doesn’t always stare you in the face, an eating disorder. Sometimes it creeps up on you when you least expect it. You may not even realise that there’s a problem until someone points it out to you. By then, you could possibly be in denial.

Struggle within

Me during chubbier days!
chubbier-day-sm

I started to struggle with my weight when I was about 15. I’m not one of those people who can indulge in absolutely anything without piling on the pounds, so my weight was always up and down until recently. There was a time when I was overweight. I wasn’t hugely so, but I was considered a “chunky monkey”. At that time in my life, I was bulimic. I didn’t know it then, but I realised a few years ago, after I’d stopped, that my method of weight loss was a type of bulimia. It wasn’t the kind that involved regurgitation. But I used to throw myself into three hours of a crazy exercise workout routine every night after school and, of course, after bingeing on food.

I remember having to go on the exercise bike in the attic every night and not getting off until I’d broken into a sweat and could smell the burning of the wheels. I remember feeling like I couldn’t go out the next day unless I did that, because I convinced myself that otherwise, I wouldn’t fit into my clothes.

Yet I just couldn’t give up overeating. I tried every diet under the sun and always ended up stuffing my greedy gob with just about anything I could find in the cupboards. I wasn’t fussy with food and I generally just loved eating.

And then, one fateful day, the exercise bike broke.

So I proceeded to use the stepper every night – in the kitchen this time. But this little machine wasn’t burning as many calories for me as the bike did. I felt that I needed something else to help get rid of the food I would binge on almost every day. This led me to try laxative pills. For almost a year and a half I was taking laxative pills, which can be bought from any supermarket in the medicine section. I started on just two a night. When they no longer gave me the effect I wanted, I gradually increased my intake until I was taking 40 a day. I knew it was unhealthy and dangerous, but I made myself believe that it was okay.

In Egypt you can get a laxative tea that advertises itself as a weight-loss solution. I’d rather not go into the gory details, but so many women drink it as if it’s normal to be stuck on the toilet with the runs every night after dinner. It’s mindboggling!

Lessons learnt
People have asked me many times how I keep slim or for tips on weight loss. I’ve ignored every request because I believe that I’m not the right person to give this sort of advice.

Now you know why.

 

trying-out-some-new-looks-sm-266x400

My bulimia didn’t help me to lose any weight whatsoever. It just made me unhealthy and played on my already weird relationship with food.

So, how was this battle between food and I sparked?

That I cannot answer, because I have no idea. All I know is that I’ve never been happy with my figure. I know I’m not fat and that I don’t need to lose weight. But like so many other women, I have never been 100-percent happy with my figure. I sometimes look at someone and wish I were as slim as her. I am also aware that although she has the perfect figure to me, I can almost guarantee you that there is something she wants to change about her body.

No one is perfect. And no one has the right to force images of what “perfection” is upon others. Who are we to decide? The most important thing is to learn to live with your body and work well with it. Take care of it, stay healthy and don’t listen to any negativity from anyone – unless it’s a health warning from your doctor, of course!

A WELLNESS CONSULTANT COMMENTS

Many of us have tried various diet programmes or exercise routines to lose weight, become more active and boost our confidence. At the end of the day, it is our body that will tell us what is best.

To do what is best for our body, we must understand how it works. We should also learn what nature intends for us through the food it produces for us. It is, after all, a form of ibadah that we study the splendid works of Allah’s creation.

Be kind to your body, keep it healthy, and it will take care of the rest. — NurAishah Chong P L, wellness consultant

 

Article from Aquila Style. 

Aquila Style

 

 

 

Dina Torkia

 

Please Visit her Wesbite for fantastic tips on fashion.

 

Share.

About Author

Islam and Eating Disorders founded in 2012 – run by Maha Khan, the blog creates awareness of Eating Disorders in the Muslim world, offers information and support for sufferers and their loved ones.

Leave A Reply